Puerto Rican Congress on Research in Education

Here is the Call for Papers for the XIII Puerto Rican Congress on Research in Education, which will be celebrated at the University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, next March 11, 12 and 13, 2015.  Included is the information in Spanish and English, those interested in submitting papers can find the information in the following web site:  http://cie.uprrp.edu/congreso  Thank you for your help.

Annette López de Méndez, Ed.D.     <alopezdemendez@hotmail.com>
Directora
Centro de Investigaciones Educativas
Universidad de Puerto Rico, Recinto de Río Piedras
Facultad de Educación
P.O. Box 23304
San Juan, Puerto Rico   00931-3304
Tel. (787)764-0000 x4384
Fax (787)764-2929

Convocatoria 2015 Call for Submissions

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Free Software for Analyzing Video

I have no experience with this software, but a colleague of mine suggested that it could be very helpful to those interested in analyzing (behavioral coding) video files!  Here is the information forwarded to me  — Jan

datavyu

Dear Colleague,

If you don’t already know about Datavyu, it’s a free and open source software tool for scoring video. It was developed by and for developmental scientists to flexibly and powerfully code observations from video data for analysis. Datavyu evolved from OpenSHAPA and the earlier MacSHAPA tool.

I am thrilled to announce that we have just released Datavyu 1.1 and published a complete Datavyu User Guide. Datavyu 1.1 contains a number of major bug fixes, user interface changes, and enhancements to increase the functionality of the software. You can download Datavyu 1.1 on our website, and get our source code on github.

Our user guide outlines everything you will need to know to become an expert Datavyu user. It comes complete with video walk-throughs, instructions for the Datavyu Ruby API scripting interface, and a sample script library. It also provides installation instructions, descriptions of software components, and in-depth tutorials for the most common operations.

Datavyu supersedes MacSHAPA and OpenSHAPA—if you’ve used either of these tools, it will be very easy to transition to Datavyu. OpenSHAPA files can be opened directly and seamlessly in Datavyu. MacSHAPA files can be easily converted with a simple Ruby script. More information on this can be found here.

Keep an eye out for the forthcoming Best Practices in Behavioral Coding that will provide advice on how to explore and code your data in the most optimal way.

We hope that you will try Datavyu 1.1 for scoring your data and see how it can help you experience the richness of behavior. If you need any help using Datavyu please visit our Support Forum, which is monitored daily by expert Datavyu users.

Sincerely,

Karen Adolph and The Datavyu Team

–
Datavyu
196 Mercer Street, Suite 807
New York, NY 10012
Office: 212-998-5536
info@datavyu.orgwww.datavyu.org

Here is the letter above in Word format:

Datavyu Software Information     

 

Qualitative Research Resources for Special Education

Here is a handout that includes a list of “qualitative research friendly” journals and selected references intended for special education researchers.  Thanks to my colleague Loretta Serna for the opportunity to speak to her class!

Qualitative Research Resources (PDF)

Qualitative Research Resources (Word)

Tenth International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry (ICQI)

The Tenth International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry will take place May 21-24, 2014 at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign .

The theme of this year’s congress is  “Qualitative Inquiry and the Politics of Research.”  The SIG in Qualitative Psychology will hold events in conjunction with the Congress with a focus on “critical and poststructural possibilities.”  [See the conference website for this and other SIG activities and information.]

Early registration: December 1   Regular registration: March 15.
Paper submissions due: December 1 (but check website for possible extension).

The International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry (ICQI) will celebrate its 10th anniversary in 2014. The 10th Congress will be built around the changes that have occurred in the field of qualitative inquiry in the decade since the Congress was launched as an alternative site for collaboration and discourse. The 2014 Congress will offer delegates an opportunity to assess the major changes that have taken place over the last decade. What might the Congress, and indeed the broader landscape of qualitative inquiry, look like in another decade? What should our mandate be for the next decade? What have we learned? Where do we go next?

Delegates are invited to submit proposals for panels and sessions that address these and other pressing questions concerning the politics of research (e.g., IRBs, grant funding, publishing, promotion and tenure, life in the corporate university, etc.). Delegates are also invited to address the events surrounding the 10th anniversary of the Congress itself, its history, and its future.

The 2014 Congress will offer scholars the opportunity to explore a decade of change, while foregrounding qualitative inquiry as a shared, global endeavor. Panels, workshops and sessions will take up the politics of research. Delegates will be able to form coalitions, to engage in debate on how qualitative research can be used to advance the causes of social justice, while addressing racial, ethnic, gender and environmental disparities in education, welfare and healthcare.  For more information, visit the ICQI website. 

The 3rd Global Congress for Qualitative Health Research

The 3rd Global Congress for Qualitative Health Research will be held in Khon Kaen, Thailand, December 4-6, 2013.  Information: http://nu.kku.ac.th/gcqhr2013/

Kindly help us by circulating this email to interested colleagues and students.

We look forward to meeting you there!

Jan Morse, Editor, Qualitative Health Research

Call for Proposals, EQRC

Please consider submitting a proposal for a paper presentation at the 26th Annual Ethnographic & Qualitative Research Conference (EQRC)

The conference will be held on February 10 – 11, 2014 at the Flamingo Hotel in  Las Vegas, Nevada with a special conference room rate of $49 per night (plus tax).

The deadline for submitting a proposal is November 16th and papers will undergo juried review on a rolling basis, with prompt notifications of acceptance/rejection so that presenters can make early and economical travel arrangements.

All presented papers are eligible for submission to the Journal of Ethnographic & Qualitative Research (JEQR), being peer-reviewed for potential publication.

Visit the website for details at www.EQRC.net

Michael W. Firmin, Ph.D.

EQRC Conference Director

 PS

EQRC this year will be held at the same hotel location and dates as the 17th Annual American Association of Behavioral and Social Sciences (AABSS) conference.  Although the EQRC is independent of AABSS, if you desire to present two (2) papers, then you may present one at EQRC and another at AABSS for the same registration fee.  See www.AABSS.net for details regarding the AABSS conference.

Thinking Qualitatively and Advances in Qualitative Methods Conferences

EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION NOW OPEN
EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION CLOSES MAY 2, 2013

13th Annual Thinking Qualitatively Workshop Series

June 17 – 20, 2013
ECHA, University of Alberta
Edmonton, AB

For More Information and To Submit Abstract
Click HERE
________________________________________

KEYNOTE SPEAKER:
Dr. Sally Thorne

This four day interdisciplinary educational series has been held annually for over a decade now and is aimed at participants from all academic disciplines and for individuals at all stages of their research career. Individuals conducting research in universities and colleges and/or professional settings (e.g., libraries; hospitals; government agencies) are welcome to attend.

TQ allows participants to engage with experts in qualitative inquiry and learn about specific methods, techniques and approaches to qualitative research.

The academic program consists of four days of hands-on workshops that include such topics as:
• Introduction to Qualitative Methods
• Grounded Theory
• Interpretive Description
• Phenomenology
• Ethnography
• Narrative Inquiry
• Mixed Methods
• Focus Groups
• Interviewing
• Software Workshops: NVivo, ATLAS.ti and other programs
________________________________________

TQ & AQM TOGETHER!

TQ 2013 will be held in conjunction with the 12th Advances in Qualitative Methods (AQM) Conference. Don’t miss the opportunity to attend both events in one week!

For more information on AQM 2013 please click HERE

IIQM PRESS RELEASE:

The International Institute for Qualitative Methodology (IIQM) is pleased to announce that the International Journal of Qualitative Methods (IJQM) has been accepted for indexing in Web of Science

SM, a comprehensive database that provides coverage of the world’s most important and influential journals. Each year over 2,000 journal titles are considered for inclusion inWeb of ScienceSM, and only 10-12% of the journals evaluated are accepted. The inclusion of IJQM in Journal Citation Reports®, Social Sciences Citation Index®, and Current Contents® demonstrates our dedication to providing the most relevant and influential qualitative methods research to our readership.

Regards,

TQ 2013 Workshop Series Organizers
International Institute for Qualitative Methodology

Tel: (780) 492-9041
Office: 5-217, Edmonton Clinic Health Academy
qualitative.institute@ualberta.ca
www.iiqm.ualberta.ca

In this reblogged post, Daniel K offers some insights and advice on writer’s block — sometimes a problem for thesis writers as well as professional authors. Another useful source of comfort and concrete advice on the “work avoidance problem” is Steven Pressfield’s The War of Art and its sequel, Turning Pro. If you are feeling “stuck” — take a look!   — Edprof

Kay Solo

I recently got into a discussion on another social network on the subject of writer’s block, and I learned that the issue of whether writer’s block is real or not is actually a point of contention. I’ve always taken the side that writer’s block is a very real thing (I’m a writer, it’s an occupational hazard), but there are many more who disagree, even to the point where I was in the minority in said discussion. I thought it was fitting for a blog post, both since I commonly write about writing and because I feel rather strongly on the subject. I should warn you readers, though: this post will get long.

The post in question was basically ten quotes from various authors talking about how writer’s block doesn’t exist, how it’s actually more like idea block and how anyone who uses that excuse is obviously just coming up…

View original post 1,267 more words

Interview Question Design Tips

There are many excellent books about qualitative research design.  These are especially valuable for those who are working without access to a mentor.  Even for those who have had classes, read books and worked with mentors, when it comes to actually designing a study, it is easy to forget some of the finer points.  This can lead to research designs (for example, interview questions) that need improvement.  As a grad student, I had the great good fortune to work with several first-rate teachers of qualitative research — Steven J. Taylor, Marion Lundy Dobbert, Gary Allen Fine, and Michael Quinn Patton.  Each generation of scholars and researchers must learn anew.  So, I pass their legacy along as I am able.

In the interest of brevity, from time to time, I will pass along a couple of “tips and tricks” to keep in mind when designing qualitative studies.  In this post, I offer three tips for avoiding design errors that can undermine the quality of your interview questions.  The media environment may tilt us all toward formulating suboptimal and problematic interview questions.  We hear a LOT of journalists posing questions that are fine for journalism, but not for social science.

Today’s tips:

Avoid “DOUBLE-BARRELED” questions.  (Asking two questions rolled into one.)  Example: “What jobs did you do at home and how did you feel about them?”  Too complicated to answer!  It can also be hard to analyze answers because in some cases, you might not be able to tell which question the interviewee is referencing in their reply.

Avoid LEADING questions.  Note that the question above is also a LEADING question.  It introduces the term “jobs” into the conversation about home life, therefore “leading” the interviewee to (perhaps) narrow her focus to a particular domain or way of thinking about her experiences.  It also assumes that we have all had “jobs” (and also that we think of certain kinds of activities as such).

And finally, avoid WHY questions.  This is because we never really know why.  Therefore, when asked, we tend to just make something up to be polite.  Again, it is just too complicated!  Better to employ that trusty tactic — “Tell me more about that…” after the interviewee “spontaneously” introduces a term or an experience that is relevant to the research question.

There you are — a few things to ponder as you (hopefully, also) enjoy the joys of the summer season.

–EdProf