Free Software for Analyzing Video

I have no experience with this software, but a colleague of mine suggested that it could be very helpful to those interested in analyzing (behavioral coding) video files!  Here is the information forwarded to me  — Jan

datavyu

Dear Colleague,

If you don’t already know about Datavyu, it’s a free and open source software tool for scoring video. It was developed by and for developmental scientists to flexibly and powerfully code observations from video data for analysis. Datavyu evolved from OpenSHAPA and the earlier MacSHAPA tool.

I am thrilled to announce that we have just released Datavyu 1.1 and published a complete Datavyu User Guide. Datavyu 1.1 contains a number of major bug fixes, user interface changes, and enhancements to increase the functionality of the software. You can download Datavyu 1.1 on our website, and get our source code on github.

Our user guide outlines everything you will need to know to become an expert Datavyu user. It comes complete with video walk-throughs, instructions for the Datavyu Ruby API scripting interface, and a sample script library. It also provides installation instructions, descriptions of software components, and in-depth tutorials for the most common operations.

Datavyu supersedes MacSHAPA and OpenSHAPA—if you’ve used either of these tools, it will be very easy to transition to Datavyu. OpenSHAPA files can be opened directly and seamlessly in Datavyu. MacSHAPA files can be easily converted with a simple Ruby script. More information on this can be found here.

Keep an eye out for the forthcoming Best Practices in Behavioral Coding that will provide advice on how to explore and code your data in the most optimal way.

We hope that you will try Datavyu 1.1 for scoring your data and see how it can help you experience the richness of behavior. If you need any help using Datavyu please visit our Support Forum, which is monitored daily by expert Datavyu users.

Sincerely,

Karen Adolph and The Datavyu Team

–
Datavyu
196 Mercer Street, Suite 807
New York, NY 10012
Office: 212-998-5536
info@datavyu.orgwww.datavyu.org

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Datavyu Software Information     

 

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Qualitative Data Analysis Web App

There are a number of useful qualitative data analysis software programs available today (HyperResearch, NVivo, and Atlas.ti are among them).  Reputable companies offer free trials, and I encourage you to test-drive these (costly) programs before purchasing one — to be sure it will do what your research requires. Here is an interesting alternative to standard QDA software programs:

Dedoose.com offers a web-based qualitative (and quantitative) data analysis web app.  The first month is free, and after that, there is a (modest) monthly charge.  Data are encrypted, and it is possible to collaborate (on data analysis) with other Dedoose app account holders.  I haven’t tried this one yet, but this might be worth a look!  — EdProf

Qualitative Research Resources

There are some amazing resources for qualitative researchers on the Internet.

Ron Chenail of Nova Southeastern University in Florida has maintained an informative and well managed online  learning site for qualitative researchers for many years.   For example, The Qualitative Report Community offers an impressive compilation of calls for papers, proposals and abstracts of interest to qualitative researchers.

Dr. Susan Hawes, a professor in the Clinical Psychology Department at Antioch University developed an impressive website for her graduate students.  See the Online Qualitative Research Resources Home Page for a listing of Qualitative Research megasites, journals, writing guidelines, and links to QDA (qualitative data analysis) software information.

St. Louis University hosts a lengthy compilation of Qualitative Research Journals.  The page hasn’t been updated in a couple of years, but as far as I know, all of the journals listed still accept qualitative research studies.

Qualitative research may, at times, seem like an exotic enterprise.  But given all the rich resources available, and the wonderful work underway and already published, I think “we” are going to be around for quite some time to come!  So — enjoy the lovely spring weather and be grateful for all the adventures you have had (and will have) as qualitative researchers.    –EdProf

The Qual Page

By way of highlighting some of the best online sources of information about qualitative research: The Qual Page is one of the enduring sites of information and expertise.  Originally founded by Judy Norris, and now managed by Judith Preissle at the University of Georgia, the Qual page provides access to a treasure trove of information.    Check it out!  — Ed Prof

The Qual Page at the University of Georgia.